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New Mexico B.A.S.S. Nation Conservation Director - Earl Conway
The mission of the New Mexico B.A.S.S. Nation Conservation Program is to provide conservation leadership by developing and supporting actions to protect, improve and sustain quality aquatic resources and user access. As role models, we continue to improve fishing through education, partnerships, communication and strong advocacy for sport fishing and sound natural resource management.





 January 7th is the next Southwest Adapt-a-Cove  habitat project at Elephant Butte Lake
Plan to meet at 8:00 Saturday at Steve Bell Construction
Three coves at Elephant Butte now have "BASS SPAWN IN PROGRESS" signs posted in front of them.  Please do not fish beyond the signs April 1 to May 31st.  The project was started last year with the Elephant Butte community leaders, anglers, and NM Game and Fish. The project is designed to allow adult fish the opportunity to spawn without getting hammered by tournament anglers.  This will assist the lake in restoring it to the trophy fishery it used to be and to secure fishing opportunities for our future anglers.  The hope is that for a short period of time during the spawn anglers will voluntarily abide by the posted off limits. We hope all anglers, especially local bass clubs, will help spread the word and participate in this effort.  Thanks for your support.
We don't have much water, so we need to squeeze as much recreation as we can from what we've got.


Pumphouse Cove and the Jungles are two of five areas approved for re-vegetation, fish habitat restoration and fish attractors.  The project has the support of local sportsmen, New Mexico Game and Fish, New Mexico State Parks, the Bureau of Reclamation.  The project has over $40,000 in funding from Shimano for youth angler participation, Audubon Toyota TogetherGreen, and the Reservoir Fisheries Habitat Program.


New New Mexico Bass Plate -Click Plate For Order Form












New Mexico BASS Federation Nation Conservation Program News and Tips:
GPS locations of some of the tree piles and artificial habitat.



  • The Mussels are coming!  A reference in the Mussel Wars shown on USGS mussel map.    We must do everything we can to slow their invasion and prepare for the day when our waters become infested. For now, let’s do what we can to help educate others about the issue and keep a close eye out for boathouse and other recreational boats coming in from other states that may be infested. Report any suspected boats to the AIS hotline at 1-877-786-7267

    For more information on how you can prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species go to:  Quagga  or  http://www.100thmeridian.org/zebras.asp


     
  • Get that hook out! Recent research shows that deep hooked fish have a much better chance if the hook is removed instead of cutting the line and hoping it will rust out. New hook materials and coatings are protecting the hook from rust and digestive juices so the fish actually has to either pass the hook or ulcerate to the point the hook falls out. Either way, it is better to risk short term injury during removal than to leave the hook in the fish. The In-fisherman recently published an excellent article with diagrams on how to remove the hook. Most of us have been afraid to touch the gills, but they aren't as fragile as we once thought. Another tip if the fish does start to bleed is to pour a little carbonated citrus soda (Sprite or 7-Up) on the wound and the bleeding should stop immediately. Keep a fish survival kit in your boat with a fizzing needle, hook remover and a small bottle of Sprite. Not only will your fish live to be released, you won't see that dead fish deduction on your weigh-in slip.

  • Fizz Your Bass!  Fizz your fish if needed but don’t over-fizz. Watch this YouTube video "Fizz your Bass" and ask Earl Conway for a deflation needle to carry in your boat if you don’t have one. He can also help you learn how to do it. This may be very important at Navajo as we may be fishing deeper than last year.